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中英文对照《化身博士》

(2019-03-05 17:14:11)
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教育

中英文对照

1  The mysterious door

Mr Utterson the lawyer was a quiet serious man Hewas shy with strangers and afraid of showing his feelings Among friends however his eyes shone with kindnessand goodnessAnd although this goodness never found itsway into his conversation it showed itself in his way of lifeHe did not allow himself many enjoyable things in life He ateand drank simply and although he enjoyed the theatrehehad not been to a play for twenty years However he wasgentler towards other men s weaknessesand was alwaysready to help rather than blame them As a lawyer he was often the last good person that evil-doers met on their way toprisonor worse These people often carried with them memories of his politeness and fairness 

Mr Utterson's best friend was a distant cousin calledRichard Enfieldwho was well known as a fun-loving manabout town’.Nobody could understand why they werefriends as they were different from each other in every wayThey often took long walks togetherhowever marchingthrough the streets of London in companionable silence

One of these walks used to take them down a narrow sidestreet in a busy part of London It was a clean busy friendlystreet with bright little shops and shiny doorknockers Nearthe end of this street however stood a dark mysteriouswindowless buildingThe door had neither bell nor knockerand looked dusty and uncared for Dirty children played fearlessly on the doorstep and nobody ever opened the door todrive them away

One dayas Mr Enfield and his friend passed the buildingMr Enfield pointed to it 

Have you ever noticed that place?’he asked.‘It remindsme of a very strange story.’

Really?’said Mr Utterson.‘Tell me.’ 

Well,’began Enfield,‘I was coming home about threeoclock on a black winter morningwhen suddenly I saw twopeopleThe first was a short man who was walking along thestreetand the second was a little girl who was running as fastas she could Wellthe two bumped into each other and thechild fell downThen a terrible thing happenedThe mancalmly walked all over the child's body with his heavy bootsand left her screaming on the groundIt was an inhuman thingto doI ran after the man caught him and fetched him backThere was already a small crowd around the screaming childThe man was perfectly cool but he gave me a very evil lookwhich made me feel sick in my stomachThe child's familythen arrived and also a doctor The child had been sent tofetch the doctor for a sick neighbourand was on her wayhome again 

‘“The child is more frightened than hurt,”said thedoctorand that you would think was the end of the storyBut you seeI had taken a violent dislike to the short manSo had the child's familythat was only naturalBut the doctor who seemed a quiet kindly man was also looking at ourprisoner with murder in his eyes 

The doctor and I understood each other perfectlyTogether we shouted at the man and told him we would tell this story all over London so that his name would be hated 

He looked back at us with a proudblach look.“Nameyour price,”he said 

We made him agree to a hundred pounds for the child sfamily With another black look the man led us to that doorover thereHe took out a key and let himself into thebuildingPresently he came out and handed us ten pounds ingold and a cheque for ninety pounds from Coutts's Bank Thename on the cheque was a well-known one

‘“See here,”said the doctor doubtfully,“it isn't usual for aman to walk into an empty house at four in the morning andcome out with another man's cheque for nearly a hundredpounds.”

‘“Don't worry,”said the man with an ugly look,“I'll staywith you until the banks openand 

change the chequemyself.” 

So we all went off the doctor and the prisoner and myselfand spent the rest of the night at my houseIn the morningwe went together to the bank Sure enough the cheque wasgood and the money was passed to the child's family.’ 

Wellwell,’said Mr Utterson 

Yes,’said Enfield,‘it's a strange storyMy prisoner wasclearly a hard cruel man But the man whose name was onthe cheque was well known all over London for his kind andgenerous actsWhy would a man like that give his cheque to acriminal?’

And you don't know if the writer of the cheque lives inthat building?’asked Mr Utterson 

I don't like to ask,’said his friend.‘In my experienceit's not a good idea to ask too many questionsin case the answers are uglyviolent onesBut I've studied the place alittleIt doesn't seem like a house There's no other doorand the only person who uses that door is the man I've just described to youThere are three windows on the side of thehousewhich look down onto a small courtyardThe windowsare shutbut they're always cleanThere's a chimney toowhich is usually smokingSo somebody must live there.’ 

The two men continued on their walk Then Utterson brokethe silence 

Enfield,’he said,‘you're right about not asking toomany questionsHoweverI want to ask the name of the manwho walked over the child.’ 

Very well,’ said Enfield.‘He told us his name wasHyde.’ 

What does he look like?’ 

He's not easy to describe although I remember him perfectlyHe's a strange-looking manHe's shortbut has astrong heavy bodyThere's something wrong with his appearancesomething ugly and unpleasingnosomethinghatefulI disliked him at once.’ 

Mr Utterson thought deeply.‘Are you sure he used a key?’he asked 

What do you mean?’asked Enfield in surprise 

I know it must seem strange,’said his friend.‘But yousee if I don't ask you the name on the cheque it's because Iknow it already…’ 

Well why didn't you tell me?’said his friend rathercrossly.‘Anyway he did have a key and he still has it Isaw him use it only a week ago.’ 

Mr Utterson looked at him thoughtfullybut said nothingmore 

 

1  一扇神秘的门

律师厄特森先生是个不爱说话、一本正经的人。在陌生人面前,他非常腼腆,不爱流露自己的情感,可当着朋友,他的眼睛总闪烁着关心与真诚的光芒,虽然这种真与善在他说的话中不大找得到,可在他的待人处世中一点一滴都没有漏掉。在生活上,他从不放纵享乐,吃喝也很随意、简单;即使很喜欢看戏,他也有20年没有进过剧院了。可是,他对别人的缺点却是宽容得不能再宽容了,总是想着去帮助他们而不是责备他们。作为一名律师,他经常是罪犯走进监狱或者踏上黄泉之前见到的最后一个好人,这些人的心里会一直保留对他的温文尔雅和公正无私的记忆。

 

厄特森先生最好的朋友是他的一个远房表亲,叫理查德·思菲尔德。这个人是城里出名的“爱热闹”,交际场里的老手。谁也搞不明白他们为何居然是朋友,他们可真有天壤之别。但他们却经常一起散步,一走就是好远,穿过伦敦的街道,安安静静地做着伴。

 

有一次,他们散步走到伦敦闹市区一条狭窄的背街上。这条街干净、热闹,人们也和善,一家家亮亮堂堂的小商店,门环锃明透亮。但是就在街道的尽头,有一幢阴暗、神秘、没有窗户的楼房,门上既没有铃也没门环,还到处是灰,显然已好久没人打扫了。脏兮兮的孩子们在门口疯玩疯闹,也没人开门轰他们走。

 

一天,他俩走过这幢房子,恩菲尔德指着问道:“你注意过那儿吗?它让我想起一个奇怪的故事。”

 

“哦,是吗?”厄特森先生说,“给我讲讲。”

 

“好吧。”恩菲尔德先生开始讲了,“那是个冬天的早上,天黑漆漆的,大概3点钟吧,我正要回家,突然看见两个人。头一个是个矮个子,正沿着街边走,第二个是个小姑娘,跑得很急。两个人一下撞到了一起,小孩儿摔倒了。接着,可怕的事发生了,那个人穿着沉甸甸的靴子,冷冷地从孩子身上压了过去,小姑娘躺在地上尖叫着。做这种事真残忍。我从后面追上来,抓住那人,把他拽了回来,这时一小群人也围到了又哭又叫的孩子身边。那个人非常镇静,一脸漠然,还狠狠地瞪了我一眼,真是让我反胃。孩子的家人这会儿也赶到了,还来了一个医生。原来小姑娘是去请医生给邻居家病人看病的,她正要回家。

 

“‘孩子与其说是伤着了不如说是吓着了。’医生是这么说的。你也许以为故事到这里就该结束了。可是你想,我对那个小个子十分厌恶,小姑娘的家人也一样——当然,这很正常,可连医生(他看上去那么和善、安静),也盯着那个罪犯看,好像恨不能把他给杀了。

 

“我和医生彼此心照不宣,都冲着那人大声指责,并声称要让整个伦敦都知道这事,让人人都唾弃他的名字。

 

“他阴森森地瞪了我们一眼,还是一副不可一世的样子,‘开个价吧,’他说。

 

“我们让他答应付给孩子家100英镑。他又翻了我们一眼,把我们领到那边的那扇门口,掏出钥匙,进了楼。不一会儿,他又出来了,递给我们10镑金币和一张康茨银行的支票,上面写着90英镑,支票上的名字是大家都很熟的人。

 

“‘你看,’医生满腹怀疑地说,‘够奇怪的,早上4点,一个人走进一所空房子,然后又拿着另一个人签名的支票出来了,足足快100镑呢!’

 

“‘放你的心吧,’一脸凶相的矮个子说,‘我和你们等着银行开门,看我自己兑钱好了。’

 

“我们离开那儿,医生、罪犯和我到我家挨过了后半夜。到了早上,我们一道去了银行,支票是真的,没问题,钱很快就转给小姑娘家了。”

 

“哦,是这样,”厄特森先生说。

 

“是啊!”恩菲尔德说,“这事真怪。明明肇事者是个冷酷、残忍的家伙,可签支票的人却是伦敦有名善良、慷慨的人。这样的人怎么会把支票给一个罪犯呢?”

 

“你们也不知道支票的主人是不是住在那幢房子里?”厄特森先生问。

 

“我可不喜欢问,”他的朋友说,“根据我的经验,提太多的问题可没什么好的。万一得到的答案既令人厌恶又令人不安,那该如何是好?但我还是稍微研究了一下那个地方。它看起来不像一所房子,没别的门,唯一使用那扇门的人就是我刚才和你讲的那个家伙。房子一侧有三扇窗户,可以看到下面的小院,窗户都关着,但一直干干净净的。还有个烟囱常冒着烟,所以肯定有人在那儿住。”

 

两个人接着走下去,厄特森忽然说:

 

“恩菲尔德,你那条规矩挺不错,就是别问太多问题。尽管如此,我还是想问问踩着孩子身体走过去的那个人叫什么。”

 

“当然了!”恩菲尔德说,“他告诉我们他叫海德。”

 

“他什么模样?”

 

“这一下子可说不好,虽然我清清楚楚记得他长得什么样。他长得很怪,个子又矮,身体粗壮,他的相貌哪儿有点不对劲,让人感到丑陋,不舒服——不,是让人憎恶的那种。我一看到他,马上就不喜欢他。”

 

厄特森先生想了好一会儿,问道:“你肯定他用了钥匙吗?”

 

“瞧你问的!”恩菲尔德一脸诧异的样子。

 

“我知道我这么问有点怪,”朋友说,“可你想,我并没问你支票上签的是谁的名字,因为我心里已经明白了……”

 

“那你怎么不早说呢?”朋友不无恼怒地说,“甭管怎么说,那家伙的确有钥匙,上礼拜我还看见他开门来着。”

 

厄特森先生心事重重地看了他一眼,但没再多说什么。

 

 

2  In search of Mr Hyde

 

 

 

After dinner that evening Mr Utterson went into his office and unlocked a cupboard He took out an envelopeIt contained the will of Doctor Henry Jekylland was writtenin the doctor's own handwriting

 

If I dieor if I disappear for more than three months,’thewill began,‘I wish to leave everything I own to my dearfriend Edward Hyde.’

 

This will had both worried and annoyed Mr Utterson To alawyer it was an unusual and dangerous kind of will It wasbad enough when Edward Hyde was only an unknown namebut now that the lawyer knew something about Hyde the willworried him more than ever It had seemed like madness beforenow it began to seem shameful With a heavy heart MrUtterson replaced the envelope in the cupboardput on hiscoat and went to see his old friend Doctor Lanyon

 

Doctor Lanyon was enjoying his after-dinner coffee.‘Comeinold friend!’ he cried The two men had known each othersince their school daysThey sat for several minutesdrinkingcoffee and talking companionably of this and that At last MrUtterson mentioned the thoughts that were worrying him

 

I supposeLanyon,’he said,‘that you and I are HenryJekyll's oldest friends?’

 

I suppose so,’said Doctor Lanyon,‘but I don't often seehim now.’

 

Really?’ said Mr Utterson in surprise.‘I thought you andhe were interested in the same things.’

 

We were at one time,’said Doctor Lanyon.‘But morethan ten years ago Henry Jekyll became toowellimaginativefor me He developed some strangewild unscientific ideas Itold him soand I've seen very little of him since then.’

 

Mr Utterson looked at his friend's red angry face.‘Only adisagreement about some scientific question,’he thought.‘It's nothing worse than that.’ Calmly he continued,‘Didyou ever meet a friend of Jekyll's a man called Hyde?’

 

Hyde?’repeated Lanyon.‘No never.’

 

Soon the lawyer said goodnight and went home to bedwhere he lay awake for a long time thinking about Enfield's description of Hydeand Doctor Jekyll's willWhen at last hefell asleephe was troubled by dreams In his mind's eye hesaw a faceless man marching over the child's bodyThen hesaw his old friend Jekyll in bedwhile the same faceless figurestood over himThe facelessness of that figure worried himdeeply

 

Very wellMr Hyde,’said the lawyer to himself,‘I willfind youand I will see your face for myself.’

 

During the next few weeks Mr Utterson spent many hoursin the narrow street where Enfield had seen HydeHe waitedpatiently near the mysterious door hoping for a sight of MrHydeand one dry clear winter night he was successfulThe street was empty and silent and small sounds carried along wayThe lawyer heard footsteps He stepped back intothe shadows and waitedA short figure turned the corner andwalked towards the mysterious door Although Mr Uttersoncould not see his face he felt a strong almost violent dislikefor the stranger

 

Mr Utterson stepped forward and touched him on the shoulder.‘Mr Hyde?’

 

Yesthat's my name,’said the stranger coolly.‘ What doyou want?’

 

I see that you're going inI'm an old friend of DoctorJekyll'sMy name is UttersonYou must have heard mynamemay I come in with you?’

 

Doctor Jekyll is not at home,’replied Mr Hyde.‘How didyou know me?’he added sharply

 

First let me see your face,’replied the lawyer

 

Mr Hyde hesitated for a moment then he stood under thestreet light and the lawyer saw his face.‘Thank you,’ saidMr Utterson.‘Now I shall know you again It may beuseful.’

 

Yes,’said Mr Hyde,‘it may indeed be usefulHeretoois my addressYou may need it one day.’He gave the lawyerhis addresswhich was in a poor part of London

 

Good God!’thought the lawyer,‘does Hyde know aboutJekyll's willIs that what he's thinking of?’But he saidnothing

 

And now,’said Mr Hyde,‘How did you know me?’

 

You were described to me.’

 

Who did that?’

 

I know people who know you.’

 

Who?’ asked Mr Hyde sharply

 

Doctor Jekyllfor example,’said the lawyer

 

He never told you!’cried Mr Hyde in sudden anger.‘Don't lie to me!’And before the lawyer could answer heturned the key in the lock and disappeared into the house

 

Mr Utterson stared at the closed door.‘Why do I dislikehim so much?’he said to himself.‘Enfield was rightthereis something evil about the manPoor Henry JekyllI'm worried about you Your new friend will mean trouble for you.’

 

Round the corner from the narrow street there was a squareof handsome old housesOne of these was DoctorJekyll's houseand Mr Utterson knocked at the front door The servant answered and told him that Doctor Jekyll was not athome

 

I saw Mr Hyde go in by the laboratory door in the street atthe back of the house said the lawyer

 

That's rightMr Utterson,’replied the servant. ‘MrHyde has his own key and comes and goes when he likes Wehave orders from Doctor Jekyll to obey him.’

 

Mr Utterson walked home more worried than ever

 

A fortnight later Doctor Jekyll gave a dinner party for a fewold friendsMr Utterson was among them and he remained after the others had left

 

I've been wanting to speak to you for some timeJekyll,’said the lawyer,‘about your will.’

 

Doctor Jekyll was a tall wellmade man of fifty with asmooth kindly face.‘My poor friend,’he said,‘you doworry unnecessarily you know Like poor Lanyon when Itold him about my new ideas.“Imaginative rubbishhe calledthem I'm very disappointed in Lanyon.’

 

But the lawyer did not want to talk about Doctor Lanyon.‘You know I've never agreed with your will,’he continued.‘You've told me often enough,’said his friend sharply

 

WellI've learnt something about your friend Hyde,’continued the lawyer

 

The colour of the doctor's handsome face changed from pinkto greyish-white.‘I don't want to hear any more,’he said.‘You don't understand I'm in a very difficultpainful situation

 

Tell me everything,’said Mr Utterson,‘and I'll do mybest to help you.’

 

You're very kindbut this is a private matterI'll tell youone thingI can get rid of Mr Hyde any time I want Youmust understandhowever that I take a great interest in poorHydeI know you've seen himhe told me and I'm afraidhe wasn't very polite to you But I really do care about himAnd if anything happens to meI want you to promise tomake sure that he inherits my money.’

 

I cannot pretend that I shall ever like him,’ said thelawyer

 

I'm not asking you to like him,’said his friend.‘I onlyask you to help himwhen I'm gone.’

 

I promise,’said Mr Utterson sadly

 

 

2  寻找海德先生

 

 

 

那天晚上,吃了饭,厄特森先生走进自己的办公室,打开柜橱上的锁,拿出一个信封,里面装的是亨利·杰基尔博士的遗嘱,是立书人亲笔写的。

 

“如果我死了,或者三个月不见踪影,”遗嘱上写道,“我希望把所有一切留给我亲爱的朋友——爱德华·海德。”

 

这份遗嘱让厄特森先生坐立不安。作为一名律师,他觉得这样的遗嘱既少见又危险。直到今天以前,他对这个爱德华·海德一无所知,这就够糟的了。可现在知道了一些有关海德的事情,遗嘱就更让他生气了。如果说以前这一切看起来是疯狂的,那么现在这个名字就是令人发指的。厄特森先生心事重重地把文件放进柜子里,穿上大衣,去找他的老朋友兰宁医生。

 

兰宁医生正在品着饭后的咖啡。“哈!老朋友,快进来!”他大声嚷着。他们俩从上学的时候起就认识。俩人坐在一起,一边喝咖啡,一边闲扯着,最后厄特森先生谈起了自己心中的不安。

 

“我想,兰宁,”他说,“你我应该是亨利·杰基尔最老的朋友了吧?”

 

“我想是吧,”兰宁医生说,“不过,我最近不常见他了。”

 

“哦,是吗?”厄特森有些吃惊地问道,“我还以为你和他兴趣相投呢!”

 

“曾经有过,”医生接着说,“不过,那是十多年前了。那以后,亨利·杰基尔变得——嗯,对我来讲太不可思议了。他脑子里装了一些奇怪、荒唐、不科学的想法,我就是这么和他说的,从那以后,我就很少见到他了。”

 

厄特森先生看着朋友气呼呼、涨红的脸,心想:“只不过是科学见解上的分歧,并没有什么大不了的。”他不动声色地又问:“你有没有见过杰基尔的一个朋友——一个叫海德的朋友?”

 

“海德?”医生重复道,“没有,从来没有。”

 

不一会儿,律师道了晚安,回家睡觉,可他躺在床上好长时间还想着恩菲尔德说的海德的样子,还有杰基尔博士的遗嘱。好不容易睡着了,可是一个梦接着一个梦,让他心绪不宁。梦里仿佛看见一个没有脸的人重重踩过孩子的身体,又看见老朋友杰基尔躺在床上,那个没有脸的人站在他身上。那个没有脸的人着实让他担心。

 

“走着瞧,海德先生,”律师自言自语地说,“我一定要找到你,亲眼看看你的模样。”

 

以后的好几个星期,厄特森先生在恩菲尔德看见海德的那条背街上徘徊了好久。他在那扇神秘的门旁耐心等着,希望能发现海德先生的踪迹。终于,一个清冷的冬夜他遇上了海德。那天晚上,街道空荡荡的,寂静无声,一点响动声都能传出去好远,律师突然听见了脚步声。他躲在阴暗处,等着。一个小个子男人转过街角,朝那扇神秘的门走去。虽然看不见陌生人的脸,但厄特森先生还是强烈地感到一种憎恨。

 

厄特森先生紧走几步,轻轻拍了拍那人的肩膀:“是海德先生吧?”

 

“正是,”陌生人冷冰冰地说,“你想怎么样?”

 

“我看见您正要进门。我是杰基尔博士的好朋友,叫厄特森,您一定听他提过我,我能和您一起进去吗?”

 

“杰基尔博士这会儿不在家,”海德回答说。突然他机容地问道:“你怎么知道我的名字?”

 

“先让我看看您的脸再说,”律师回答道。

 

海德犹豫了一下,接着站到路灯下,律师看清了他的脸,说:“谢谢您,我有幸认识您了,这也许会有用的。”

 

“不错,”海德说,“确实会有用的。喏,还有我的地址,说不定有一天您用得着。”他说了自己的住处,在伦敦的一个贫民区。

 

“天哪!”律师想,“海德一定知道杰基尔的遗嘱吧?他打的就是这个主意吧?”但律师没说出来。

 

“那么,”海德问,“你怎么会知道我呢?”

 

“听人跟我讲起过您。”

 

“谁说的?”

 

“咱们都认识的,”律师说。

 

“是谁?”海德厉声问道。

 

“譬如说,杰基尔博士,”律师答道。

 

“他决不会和你说的!”海德突然生气地吼了起来,“别想骗我了!”还没等律师答话,他掏出钥匙开了门,消失在屋里。

 

厄特森先生盯着紧闭的大门,自言自语道:“我怎么那么不喜欢他呢?恩菲尔德说得对,这个人骨子里有股邪气。可怜的亨利·杰基尔,真让人为你担心,你这个新朋友会给你惹麻烦的。”

 

在小街的拐弯处有一个广场,里面的建筑都是些富丽堂皇的老房子,其中有一幢是杰基尔博士的。厄特森先生敲响了前门,仆人开了门,告诉他博士这会儿不在家。

 

“我看见海德先生从屋子后面的街上,从实验室的门进来了,”律师说。

 

“是的,厄特森先生,”仆人回答说,“海德先生自己有钥匙,想来就来,想走就走,主人吩咐过我们要服从他。”

 

厄特森先生回家时,心里更担心了。

 

两个星期后,杰基尔博士请老朋友上他家吃饭,厄特森先生也去了,而且一直呆到别人都告辞了。

 

“杰基尔,我一直想和你谈谈,”律师说,“是你那个遗嘱的事。”

 

杰基尔博士五十开外,高高的个子,身材匀称,总是一副安详、和善的表情。“我可怜的朋友,”他说,“真没必要担什么心,就和那个可怜的兰宁医生一样,我把自己的想法告诉他,他却说是‘幻想的垃圾’,他真让我失望。”

 

律师并不想谈兰宁医生,他接着说:“你明白,我从来就没同意过你那个遗嘱!”

 

“你早告诉过我好几回了!”博士的话有点刺耳。

 

“那就好。不过我最近听到一些有关你的朋友海德的事,”律师继续说。

 

博士那英俊、红润的脸庞一下子变得灰白。“我不想再听了,”他说,“你不明白,我现在的处境有多困难,多痛苦。”

 

“把一切都告诉我,”厄特森先生说,“我会尽力帮你的。”

 

“你待我真好,可这是我个人的事。我只能告诉你一件事——只要我愿意,随时可以摆脱这个海德先生。但有一点希望你能理解,我对可怜的海德也极为关注。我知道你见过他——他告诉我了,我担心他对你有所冲撞,但我确实很关心他,要是我出了什么不测,你一定要保证让他继承我的财产。”

 

“我没法假装自己喜欢他,”律师说。

 

“我并不要求你喜欢他,”他的朋友说,“我只要你帮助他,要是我不在了。”

 

“好吧,我答应你,”厄特森先生忧郁地说。

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