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【卡米洛特★译】彼得森博士(绝对震撼)II

(2010-06-09 10:50:28)
标签:

音乐

and

of

to

皮特

杂谈

分类: 真相揭露(Camelot)【★★】

BR: What I would love to ask you about, Pete, before we go into some of the stories that you have to tell – and we have good reason to believe that, having spent the best part of twelve hours yesterday talking about a tiny fraction of your experience, I think that we could probably talk, literally, for days – what the people watching this video are really concerned about, I think, is what can you help them understand better than they do at the moment about what's really happening on this planet at the moment? What are the agendas of the controllers? How much trouble are we in and what can people do?

比尔:但我想问问您,皮特,在我们进入你肯定要谈到的一些故事之前——我们有很好的理由相信,通过我们昨晚花了12个小时的美好时光来谈到的一小部分你的经历,照这个(才谈到一小部分)我想我们可能会说上几天——我认为看这个视频的人都很关心的 是:你怎样能帮助他们更好地理解 关于此刻真正发生地球上的事情?那些控制者的(会议)议程是什么?我们究竟有着多大的麻烦,人们能够做什么?

And I want to put that question on hold because this is the purpose of this video as far as we're concerned.

我想先把这个问题搁在一边吧,因为就我们的关注 的而言,这个问题是这次录像的最终目的。(后面再总结交纳)
There's a whole separate topic, which is a technological topic, because this man we're talking to now has told us about technology that we didn't know existed. My brain is still reeling over a conversation that we had at breakfast this morning about which I'm going to say nothing.

我有一个完全分开的话题,一种技术性话题,因为您告诉我们一些甚至我们都不知道它的存在的技术/科技。我的脑子都依然沉浸在及早吃早餐时候的谈话中,我几乎都说不出什么具体的来.(还没消化好)

Now, before we start all of that – and that was a wonderful overview that you gave about your intentions – can you give us a little bit of a timeline of your career history which started when you were very young? A little bit about the kind of things you've been involved in? We're not asking you to name names, but we just want to present you as somebody who… people can get some kind of an idea of who this person is that we're talking to whose name they haven't heard before.

现在,在我们开始前-你刚给我们的对你自己意图的概述很好很强大-你能给我们说一点你从很小就开始的职业生涯的大事年表吗?能说一些关于你卷入的这些事情吗?我们并不要求您对它们指名道姓,但我们只是想呈现在外面的你是这样一个人:人们可以获得一个很好的关于这人是谁的概念 ,尽管他们还没有听说过他们的姓名。

PP: Well, I can do that. A very interesting thing we were talking about... I have no idea where these thoughts came to me, but I know that very early on in life I was so different from the people around me that I thought that probably I fell from the sky in a titanium egg and landed in my grandfather’s orchard and my parents found me there.

皮特:好吧,我可以做到(你的要求)。我们谈论了一个非常有趣的事情……我不知道这些思想来自哪里,但我一生中很早期就知道我和我周围的人是如此不同,我曾想,大概我是从天上落下来的,本来呆在一个钛组成的蛋里,后来降落在我祖父的果园里,我的父母在那儿发现了我。(呵呵,很天真有趣的想法)

BR: And I think you're probably right, actually, having talked to you for two days.
比尔:实际上经过跟您两天的讨论,我想你是对的。(开玩笑)

[laughter]
[两人都笑]

PP: Until I was about 22, I actually believed that.
皮特:当我22岁的时候,我其实还认为我那个猜想没错.(不会吧!)

DAVID WILCOCK (DW): [touching Pete on the shoulder with his finger] He is real. He's solid.
)J大卫.威尔库克:[用手指碰了碰皮特的肩膀] 他绝对是真人,他是固体的.(呵呵,真会开玩笑啊

PP: Then I quit believing that when I was in my mid-20s and in my last few years – I'm nearly 70 – and in my last few years, I've started believing that again. Because I find that the people I'm stuck with here on this little spaceship Earth don't seem to have the same view of anything. It may be that I'm just wacky, but my wackiness has made a lot of products and made a lot of sense to a number of people throughout my life.

皮特:然后在我20几岁的时候,我不相信我那个猜想了,再然后——我现在近70岁 ——在我最近的几年中,我又开始相信了(相信他来自一个钛蛋)。因为我发现我在 地球号航天飞船 上必须接受的这些人们 都似乎不太有和我相同的观点。这可能是我由于我很古怪吧,但我的古怪制造了很多的产品,对于贯穿我一生的很多人都是有很大的意义的.

For some reason I... well, it’s probably genetics, because on both of my parents’ sides I have long lines of geniuses that extend back in history. I grew up in a home that was entirely powered and heated and cooled, in a very temperate climate, was powered by the sun and by atmospheric pressure change. It was a home that had a gallery inside of it, much like Mexican haciendas, but was covered, where we grew all of our meat products in the form of chickens and rabbits and such, and where we grew all of our food products.

因为某些原因,我……嗯,这可能是遗传的,因为我继承了父母双方所有的天赋,这在家族中可以回溯到历史长河中去。我生长在这样一个家庭:那里可以完全地提供动力、冷时加热、热时冷却,维持在一个非常温和的气候,最终动力是由太阳和气压变化提供和驱动。那里有着有一条地道,就像墨西哥的“大庄园”,但是被隐蔽地覆盖了起来,在那里,我们养殖鸡和兔子之类的 来提供肉制品,同时我们也种植所有所需的食品。
BR: So you had an interesting and unusual upbringing.
比尔:因此 ,您有着有趣而不同寻常的教养,对吧?

PP: I had an interesting and unusual upbringing. We drove in cars that my father made and invented. We lived in homes that my father built out of strange materials that were very highly insulated. My dad was a pioneer in tilt-up concrete buildings and was an engineer for the military in my youth through the Second World War.

皮特:不错,我有一个有趣而不寻常的教养。我们开的是我父亲发明制作的汽车。我们住在我父亲用奇怪的材料建造的家里,这种材料是高绝缘和绝热的。我的爸爸是倾斜的混凝土建筑的先锋,并且他是二战中为军队工作的工程师,那时我还很年轻。
BR: And you were hand-picked and chosen for a special program when you were as young as 13. Is this correct?
比尔:那么 ,在您13岁的时候为一个特别的计划/ 程序 被精选出来,是吗?

PP: Yes, I distinguished myself at age 10 by building a number of rockets that held world altitude records, and by inventing a material that's used even today to power solid-fuel rockets. That material got out of my hands because I'm not a businessman, and wasn't a businessman, and freely gave it away and other people capitalized on it. But I liked explosions, and so, early on, started building rockets.

皮特: 是的,我区别自己于别人 是在10岁的时候,那时我建造了很多火箭,并且保留了世界的(火箭飞行)高度纪录,那时我还发了一种至今还在用于为固体燃料火箭提供动力的材料。那中资料之后逃脱了我的手,因为我不是一个商人,而那时当然也不是商人,并直率地放弃了,别人就利用了它。但我那时确实喜欢爆发,因此,在早期,我就开始建造火箭。

BR: There's a wonderful story that you told us yesterday that we'd love to say again very briefly. I'm going to be using the word briefly in my questions here with an apology, because we know that you could talk with us, literally, for days about the extraordinary experiences you've had, the things that you know, the things you've been told, the things that you strongly believe with good reason. But one of the stories that we wanted you to tell is what happened one day, when you were ten years old, with a bunch of adults, and you had an extraordinary experience.

比尔:你昨天告诉我们一个精彩的故事 ,我们愿意再简单说说。我要带着歉意地在问题中用到“简单地”这个词,因为我们知道,你可以把您那些与众不同的经历和我们说上几天,你可以跟我们说说你知道的,你被告知的,以及那些你有很好的理由坚信的事情。但是我们想让您谈的一个故事是:在你10岁的一天时,您说过您跟一群成年人有过一个非凡的经历,谈谈这次经历好么?

PP: Well, I'll preface that just a little bit with the fact that, as I was growing up, it was in a very small country town about three blocks long and not a lot of people. My parents had a home that had a formal garden, and many of the local people would borrow that for weddings and family reunions and things like that, which my parents gladly lent them the facilities. There was a wedding that went on and, as I remember, it was kind of in maybe June or July of 1950.

皮特:好,我以一点儿事实开始说吧,在我成长的过程中,那是在一个很小的乡村小镇,大概只有3个街区那么长,那里住的人并不多。我父母有一个家,家里有一个正式的花园,许多当地人会借用那个花园来举行婚礼和家人团聚等类似这样的事情,而我的父母也很乐意借给他们所需的工具、设备。当时就有一个结婚在持续举行着,就我所记得的,那好像是在1950年六月或七月份。

At that point I had very limited educational resources in this tiny town, but one of the books that got me very, very interested in ancient peoples and anthropology and archeology was the book that was written about the discovery of King Tut's tomb. About the time I finished that book, it got me very, very excited to learn about the Egyptians, and learn about the technologies that they had, and who they were and how they built the Pyramids.

在那时,我在这个小镇有着非常有限的教育资源,但其中有一本书,让我非常感兴趣于古代人类,它以人类学和考古学的角度,写了关于图坦卡蒙法老王墓穴的发现与探索。看完那本书,使得我非常 、非常兴奋地去了解埃及人,并且了解他们的技术,了解他们是谁,以及他们如何建造了金字塔。

A lecturer came to town, the man who wrote the book Kon-Tiki, Thor Heyerdahl. Then that got me excited, so I decided I wanted to be an anthropologist-archaeologist and was dead set on it and reading everything I could get through the state library system on that subject.

之后一位讲师来到镇上,那就是《木筏之旅》(讲的是六个挪威人乘坐木筏横渡太平洋的故事)的作者:托尔.海尔达尔。这让我很兴奋,所以我决定了,我想成为一名 人类学家 兼 考古学家 ,并铁定了心地要进行研究,并阅读一切我能通过国家书库系统得到的关于这个话题的东西。

Along came this wedding, and just about as the preacher was to say the words of destruction to the bride and groom, someone pointed up to the sky and said: What’s that? And everyone turned around – there were about 130 people there – everyone turned around and looked. And for the next two hours everyone at the wedding watched a series and groups of what I can only call flying saucers flying through the air – some as close as maybe 100 feet and some as far away as, maybe, 20 miles – put on a spectacular show. Everyone there saw it, as did many people in the surrounding community.

随之而来的是这个婚礼,产不多就在牧师正要对新娘和新郎说关于(假如婚姻)破坏的词时,有人突然指着天空说:“那是什么?!”每个人都转过身来——那儿大约有130人——每个人都转过身来看。接下来的两个小时, 婚礼上的每个人看到了一系列成群的东西在空中掠过-我只能叫它们飞碟,最近的距离人们大概100英尺,最远的大概距我们20英里-它们上演了一场壮观而引人入胜的表演。那儿的每个人都看到了,周围社区里的人们也看到了。

DW: Were they all the same?
大卫.维尔库克:那些飞碟都是一个样么?

PP: No, there were very different ones. Some were the shape of a pencil and seemed to have windows along the periphery. Some were round like a ball. Some were saucer-shaped with a bubble or a dome on top, some saucer-shaped with two or three bubbles on the bottom.

皮特:不,有一些是非常不同的。有些似铅笔的形状,沿着外围似乎有窗口。有些是像球一样圆。有一些碟形的 顶上是泡状物或者圆屋顶,另一些碟形的飞船下面有两个或三个泡状物。

If you go back and look through the various flying saucer sightings that we’ve heard about over the years, there was probably one or two of everything we’ve ever heard about. [laughs] These things would dash away clear out of sight and come back. They would run away from the people at the wedding party directly, so you were looking just at one spot...

如果你回过头去看各种我们在过去的几年中听说的飞碟目击事件,那或许其中一两个就是我所经历的。(笑)这些东西会迅速离开至完全看不见 然后回来。他们会立即逃离开结婚宴会上的人们,所以你(最后)仅仅看到一个斑点……

BR: And the significance of this is that, at this point, you made a major life change. Right?
比尔:这里重要的是,在这时开始,您做了一个重要的人生改变,对吗?
PP: It was called the TARDIS. So he was a Time Lord and he would travel back and forth in both space and time. So, as I tried to figure out how to build a flying saucer, I found out it was easier to build a TARDIS. Then I got thinking: Well, who wants to just shove an aerodynamic body through air when you can just simply get somewhere and dial your destination and walk out where you are, and you don’t have to push anything through the air?

皮特:是的,这就是所谓的“塔迪斯”。所以他是一个时间领主,他能同时在时间和空间上穿越到过去或者未来。所以,当我试图想出如何建造一个飞碟时,我发现建造一个时间机器“塔迪斯”更容易一点。然后我想:“好,当你可以仅仅简单地通过(在电话亭-时间机器里)向目的地打一个电话、出来就到达那儿时,谁还会想通过空气阻力推动什么流线型车身呢?前者根本不需要你通过空气把任何东西向前推动.”

Anyway, I worked toward that end and have done many, many science projects, some for large corporations, some for – we’ll call them “agencies” – and many of them for myself. I’m in the process now, at age 69, of building a laboratory to complete the work that I’ve done, and having acquired a number of very special pieces of equipment for researching such things.

不管怎么说,我为此已经做了许多,许多许多的科学项目,一些是为大型公司做的,一些是为——我们称其为“代理机构”——当然很大一部分是为自己做的。我今年69岁,我现在还在进行一座实验室的建设,以完成我所做的工作,并且已经获得了一些用来研究这些项目的非常特别的设备零件。

So that’s what I’m about right now. I’m in the process of building that laboratory in a remote location where there are very little man-made magnetic fields. We don’t really get television or radio direct much here and have very, very little man-made interference – electromagnetic interference – and it allows me to do my work that I need to do. So that’s the life change that happened when I was ten years old and so I’ve been on that pursuit ever since.

所以这就是我现在所做的事情。我正在一个边远地区建设这个实验室,那里有(影响范围)非常小的人造磁场。在这里我们无法接受电视或收音机信号,这儿有着非常,非常小的人为干扰——电磁干扰——这种干扰使得我能做我需要做的事。因此那就是我十岁时生活所发生的改变,所以我也从那时一直追求(我所要的工作)至今。

BR: And we would say be careful what you wish for because now you have the understanding, as far as you have told us in our conversations so far, you have actually the understanding, if you don’t have the factory, to actually be able to make these machines. You can also confirm that the Powers That Be on planet Earth actually have access to this technology and use it for all kinds of reasons. Is this correct?

比尔:我们想对您说:“你要对您期望得到的保持谨慎态度”,因为目前就你告诉我们的而言,您 现在有着超常的 理解(力),如果你没有工厂,实际上也能制造这些机器。你也可以证实,地球上的“媒介与权势”实际上使用着这样的技术,并以各种各样的原因利用它。我说的没错吧?

PP: As far as I can tell, there are a number of governments that have this technology. My feeling is, and/or my knowledge is, that it’s been acquired from people who came to this planet from off planet. And it’s been from the reading of a lot of ancient documents dating back as far as 6,000 years.

皮特:我能告诉你的是,有相当数量的政丄府拥有这项技术。我的感觉是,并且/或着以我的知识,那是从天外来客那里获取得到的(技术)。而且它是从很多 远到六千年前的古代文献中读来的(技术)。

BR: To the Sumerians.
比尔:是在苏美尔人(古代文献中读来的)吧.

PP: To the Sumerians. I have a Sumerian document that’s been translated that tells exactly how to build a flying saucer and it’s a direct translation. It probably doesn’t give everything, but it certainly gives the principles and I’ve experimented with a number of those principles and find out that things take place that in modern physics aren’t possible.

皮特:是的。我有一个经过翻译了的苏美尔人的文件,精确地讲述了如何建造一个飞碟,不过是直译的。它可能不会给你所要的一切,但它确实给出了建造原理,我曾按照这些原理进行了试验,依照现代物理学来说,那些是不可能发生的。

I’ve worked with a group of scientists that have recently discovered things in both mathematics and science that would lead me to believe that the greater part of science that we have today – and I have a PhD degree in Natural Philosophy, which they used to call Physics, that took a lot of effort to acquire – and it leads me to believe that these ancient documents portray knowledge that we simply don’t have, and that the knowledge we do have is wrong.

我曾跟一群科学家共事,并在最近我们在数学和科学上发现了某些东西,而这会让我相信现今的大部分学科/科学——我有一个自然哲学的博士学位,他们惯于称作 物理学,那史我花费了很大精力才取得的——它让我相信这些古代文献描述了我们根本没有的知识,而且我们所有的相关知识是错误的。
BR: And you’ve been privileged to spend time in the Vatican library. Is this something you can talk about on record?
比尔:您被给予特权 可以花时间去梵蒂冈图书馆。这个您可以公开谈论吗?

PP: Uh... probably. Well, I can talk about things that... There is a lot of information there that is very contrary to things that we believe very deeply, both philosophically and scientifically, and that’s basically been held away from the public – it’s not common knowledge – a lot of translations which, I think, probably came from the remnants of what didn’t burn in the Great Library of Alexandria, very ancient documents.

皮特:呃……或许可以。好吧,我可以谈论这些……那儿(梵蒂冈图书馆)有着大量的与我们深信不疑的知识背道而驰的信息 ,不管是在哲学上还是在科学上,而那些信息基本上都被远离于公众——这不是大家都知道的事——我认为,那儿大量的译文可能是来自于古亚历山大图书馆中未遭焚烧的残留文献,那都是十分古老的文献。

I was involved, for a time, with machine language translation of a lot of that material which was, in those days, somewhat crude but at least it gave us some ideas. And the ones that looked good were later translated by people who had done, you know, lifetime studies of the language, and I think they’re pretty fair translations.

在那些日子里,我一度纠缠在那些机器语言资料的翻译当中,有点粗糙,但至少它给我们提供了一些想法。那些看起来不错的资料后来被终身研究语言翻译的人员翻译了出来,我认为翻译得相当不错.

BR: Are you able to say anything about anything that you learned about the Anunnaki? Or is this off-record as well?
比尔:您能谈谈您所了解到的安奴纳奇人的东西么?或者这也是不宜公开报道的么?

PP: Well, the Anunnaki, who are written about in the Christian and Jewish Bible texts... there are... I’ve seen skeletons of what we call giants.

皮特:嗯..安奴纳奇人,被写在基督教《圣经》和犹太《圣经》的文字里…他们是…我听到过我们称之为“巨人族”的骷髅.

There’ve been recent giants. They are, you know, people that would travel around with traveling circuses and so forth that were very, very large through genetic problems that they had; genetic errors. All of them had joint problems; they had organ problems; they died young; the bodies couldn’t support the weight, things like that.

近代就有过巨人族。你知道的,他们是以旅行马戏团等的形式四处游荡,他们是很高大 很高大的,他们有着遗传/基因 问题;基因误差。他们所有的人都有关节问题;他们器官也有问题,他们很年轻就去世了;因为身体不能支撑其体重,类似这样的原因。

But some of the skeletons don’t show those anomalies that one would see. They’re very well-formed. They’re very much like our skeletons in many respects. They were written about in the Bible and they were written about in other ancient texts, so one has to believe...

但有些骷髅没有显示出这些你能看到的异常。他们身体结构完好。他们的骨骼在多个方面和我们的非常相似。他们在《圣经》中被记述到,被古代文字中也有写到,因此你不得不相信…

I know that there were numerous suggestions that DNA tests be run on them once we got DNA testing pretty well down, and I know those have been thwarted by various religions and various school bodies, people not wanting to say that there are things that we don’t understand, or that they don’t understand or that they don’t want to understand.

我知道有很多建议,说 一旦我们的DNA检测完成得很好,DNA测试就会在他们身上进行;我知道那些被不同宗教和不同学校的课本所反对,人们不愿意说有他们不理解的事情,或者他们不明白,或者他们不想去弄明白。

BR: But we human beings are from ET lineage -- are we not?
比尔:但是我们(地球)人类来自外星血统 – 不是吗?

PP: My belief is that... I’ll give you an example. Radio carbon dating has become very, very accurate. We have very good records of cave men that didn’t have a language. Some drew pictures, some didn’t. We found caves with their tools in them, with the evidences of their civilization, with their making crude tools and things. There’ve been a number of spots that those were found, especially in Africa and Europe and the Middle East.

皮特:我认为……我给你举个例子。无线电碳(-14)年代测年已变得非常非常地准确。我们有很好的没有语言的穴居人的记录。一些(穴居人)画画,一些则没有。我们发现藏有他们的工具的洞穴,那儿有着他们文明的凭证,以其制作的粗糙的工具和事物。已经有很多地点发现了这类洞穴,特别是在非洲、欧洲和中东地区。

Then, all of a sudden, over an 80-year period, emerged a civilization that, for 3,000 years, had the same language and the same religion and the same writing and the same mathematics, and was very, very advanced from things that came afterward. And, you know, in modern history since, oh, let’s say 300 BC, we haven’t had any civilization that didn’t change the language to where you couldn’t read it in a 300-year period.

然后 ,在80多年的时期内, 突然之间涌现出了一个持续了3000年的文明,这个文明内部有着相同的语言,相同的宗教和相同的书写和相同的数学,而且所有这些都非常,非常先进于后来才出现的东西(文明/文化)。你知道,在近现代历史上,哦,具体说从公元前300年开始以来,我们没有任何文明在300年中都没有改变其语言,改变到一种你看不懂的语言。(就是说对于一个持续3000年的文明,其语言自始至终没有任何的改变是很离奇、不正常的事情)

PP: Well, I don’t have absolute proof of that. That’s one reason I’m building the laboratory here. But one of the things I did notice in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s... I did a lot of medical equipment engineering, and I designed a machine that would read a field that surrounded the human body and could give you a read-out on the condition of the organs, organ by organ, in the body. Then it could locate or find, or even create, a medication that would fix it. One of the things that I found was, in the early beginning, that that machine could pretty accurately come up with a diagnosis rate of 50 percent.

皮特: 哦,我没有绝对的证据。那也正是我建造实验室的缘由之一。但是我在70年代末80年代初的时候注意到了……我做了很多的医疗设备的工程,并且我设计了一台机器,能读出包围在人体周围的场 ,还可以给你关于器官状况的示值读数,可以在体内一个器官一个器官地读出。然后它会定位或发现,甚至制造出一种药物来治疗、修理好它。其中我发现,在早期开始的时候,那台机器就可以相当准确地提出一个比率为百分之五十的诊断。

Of course, I wanted it to be perfect and spent a number of years finding out that the reason I didn’t get over 50 percent was because a lot of people had genetic errors in their genetic system. As a result of that, they had disease processes that were based on those genetic errors. So you had to treat them very different -- these people who had a disease that was based on virii or germs, or other... parasites especially.

当然,我希望使它变得完美,我花了数年时间发现,我没有克服百分之五十(准确率)的一个原因是 很多人在他们的遗传体系中有着遗传基因的误差。结果是,他们有了基于遗传基因误差的病程。因此,你必须以非常不同的方式对待他们——那些有着基于virii或致病菌或其他…尤其是寄生虫而产生疾病的人。

So I finally got it to where about 70 to 75 percent of the diagnoses appeared correct and the selection of medication treatment appeared correct. Then I thought: Well, okay. There’s 15 percent here that I really don’t understand.

所以我终于把诊断的正确率提高到了大约70~75%,并且药物治疗的选择也显得正确了。然后我想:“嗯,好吧。这里的15%(不确定率/不确诊人数),我真的弄不明白。”

It was about, oh, ten or fifteen years later that we got pretty familiar with and pretty good with genetic testing, and I found that that 15 percent of people had very, very similar sequences in the DNA that were unlike the other 85 percent of the people – and they were unlike anything else on Earth. They appeared to be alien to the Earth. So I thought: Well, that well could be through exposure to some form of solar radiation or some type of ionizing radiation.

那是在十年或十五年之后,我们已经很熟悉基因测试了,并且进行得相当不错,我发现,有15%的人有着非常、非常相似的DNA序列,这部分人不像其他85%的人 — 并且他们也不像地球上其他生物的(DNA序列)。他们似乎与一般的地球生物很相异。所以我想:“好吧,那很可能是通过暴露在某种类型的太阳辐射或某种类型的电离辐射下而形成的差异(激发变异)。”

So we looked at people that lived in areas that had natural radioactive compounds, like the areas in southern Utah where a lot of the carnotite and other uranium-bearing ores were mined and people that spent time there, people that were in fallout zones of nuclear testing at the nuclear test center in Nevada...

所以,我们看到人们居住在有天然放射性化合物的地区,比如在犹他州南部地区有很多地方在开采钒钾铀矿和其他含铀矿石,人们在那儿度过着生命,我们也看到生活在“内华达核实验中心” 核试验的放射性尘埃区域的人们……[Ed note: a video splice begins here on a different topic] We sent the Gemini capsule up, and it went up – the first capsule that went up – so we’re all sitting in Mission Control and called up and you know, Ground to capsule, Ground to capsule. Hello. Do you read us?
[编者注:这儿是一个不同话题的视频接合]

我们将双子太空舱发射升空——第一个升天的太空舱,所以我们都坐在太空航天地面指挥中心,并且打电话给太空舱的人,你所知道的,比如说些什么“对地会话、对地会话。喂,你能听到吗?”

[Pete makes noise like muffled radio communication] ...comes back and there was dead silence and then everybody laughed because we had the thing, the last guy that went to work had to be the guy that ran for lunch, and right down the street from JPL, right above the Rose Bowl, was like one the first Jack-in-the-Boxes.
[皮特演示制造噪音,就好像听不清的无线电通讯]

……恢复原状后,那里是一片死寂,之后每个人都笑了起来,因为我们拥有这重要的东西,最后一个去上班的那个家伙必须匆匆跑去取大家的午餐,而餐厅就在喷气推进实验室的街边,就在玫瑰碗的上面,就像第一个魔术箱。(不能说点有用的么...- -!)

And you’d drive in and you’d order, and they’d repeat order back and it’d come back [makes noise like muffled radio communication] and you couldn’t hear a word. So everybody realized that these astronauts had taken their turn going and getting lunch, and etcetera, etcetera, and everybody laughed and thought they were simulating the Jack-in-the-Box effect.

你赶进来,你发个口令,他们会回答口令,这就又恢复原状了[发出嘈杂声,就好像听不清的无线电通信]你听不到任何一个人说话。所以大家意识到宇航员们已经轮流完了,吃午餐去了,等等,每个人都笑着,以为他们在模拟魔术箱的效果。

It turns out that that was the best communication that we had, so immediately Chris Kraft turns to me and says: Peterson! Solve this problem. So I made a thing that we eventually called the “Lecture Laundry” and it was a device that found out why such things took place. And they still take place. You still go to drive-ins and you can’t understand a darn thing.

原来,那是我们拥有的最好的沟通,所以克里斯.卡夫立刻转向我,说:“彼得森!解决这一问题。”所以我做了一件东西,我们最终称其为“洗衣房的讲座”,这种设备,发现了为什么这样的事情会发生。他们还在发生。你还是在去司机餐馆,你却不能理解这个该死的东西。

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