加载中…
正文 字体大小:

美国网站Beyond Hollywood影评:《花木兰》

(2010-03-14 09:39:00)
标签:

赵薇

电影

花木兰

vicki

zhao

wei

mulan

娱乐

分类: 电影评论FilmReviews

翻译提到赵薇的部分:

“毫无新意的故事情节包裹了花木兰和她的发展,所以马楚成很幸运有值得信赖的赵薇,她实际上一肩挑起整部影片超过她应承担的部分,使表演在坚强与脆弱之间准确地找到了平衡。尽管她装扮的男人不是特别可信,尤其是她没有更多掩盖自己女性身份。但是她做到了使角色可信而不只是一个武士而已。

……

这个结果加上更重要的赵薇的演出,《花木兰》要好于预期,并且是一部特别值得肯定的类型片。”

 

Mulan (Hua Mulan, 2009) Movie Review

Asian Movie News, Asian Movie Reviews, Chinese Movie Reviews, Mulan (2009) Movie, Reviews — By James Mudge on March 9, 2010

 


 

Given the continuing popularity of the Chinese costume epic, it’s pretty much inevitable that all manner of legends and enduring tales will be dusted off and brought to the screen as blockbusters. And so up steps director Jingle Ma, known for commercial hits such as the recent “Butterfly Lovers” and “Playboy Cops”, with a new, big budget, all star version of the legend of “Mulan”. The story has certain proved a favourite through the years, having been adapted many times in the past, even enjoying the dubious distinction of having been made into a cartoon over in Hollywood by Disney. Here, Ma offers up a somewhat more grounded take, bringing in top actress and recent “Red Cliff” heroine Vicki Zhao as the fabled girl in general’s clothing.

Taking on the role of the titular Hua Mulan, she plays a young girl who disguises herself as a man to go to war in place of her ailing father, to defend the Wei people against the barbarian hordes of the Rouran. As she finds success on the battlefield, she also develops an unsurprisingly strained romance with a fellow general (played by Aloys Chen, with whom Zhao starred in “Painted Skin”), who comes to realise that in order for her to fulfil her potential, her heart will have to be hardened to the horrors of war. As the new ruthless leader of the Rouran (Hu Jin, recently in “Bodyguards and Assassins”) plans an invasion, the nation’s need grows ever more desperate, and she does indeed find herself faced with increasingly hard decisions and personal sacrifices.

Obviously, the “Mulan” story is likely to be very familiar to most, though it has a classical rather than hackneyed air, with Ma covering the passing of time quite well and giving the proceedings a suitably epic feel. The plot unsurprisingly revolves almost entirely around Hua Mulan and her development, and so Ma is fortunate to have a genuine star in Vicki Zhao, who effectively carries the film on her more than capable shoulders, turning in a performance that strikes just the right balance between tough and vulnerable. Although the premise of her being mistaken for a man isn’t particularly convincing, especially since she never makes much effort to hide her obvious femininity, she does manage to make her character convincing, not playing her as a straight warrior. This turns out to be both the film’s greatest strength and its one real weakness, as whilst it delivers a Mulan who is believable and whose relationships with the rest of the cast give her a certain amount of emotional grounding, on the downside, she does spend a fair amount of the running time moping around or crying – not exactly what some viewers expecting to see an all-action female warrior might have hoped for.

Certainly, the film does get pretty sappy in places, and as a result the pace is a bit variable, though it is at least never dull and there isn’t too much in the way of needless comic relief, Jaycee Chan’s bumbling soldier friend aside. As with “Butterfly Lovers”, Ma seems to be trying to tick too many boxes at once, without ever showing too much skill at melodrama. The film is still engaging enough, though it’s hard not to feel that he might have been better off either focusing more on historical detail, or on fleshing out the central romance between Zhao and Chen to make it more believable. This having been said, the film is never offensive, and benefits from being quite harsh and downbeat in places, with most of the supporting cast being dispatched and with poor Mulan going through some pretty tough times – though Ma certainly milks every one of these moments for all they are worth.

His direction is somewhat more focused than in previous outings, and the film is generally well handled, in a fairly standard, Chinese epic type fashion. Although it leans towards the gritty style of “The Warlords”, it retains a slightly glossier feel, with the obviously high budget having been put to good use, in particular with regards to the impressive looking costumes and armour. Wisely, Ma throws in a good amount of action, with plenty of mass battle scenes, and some nice sweeping camera shots, all of which helps to inject a little excitement, thankfully without too much use of unconvincing CGI. Stephen Tung’s choreography is solid, and though the film is never quite brutal enough to hammer home some of its bleaker moments, it still has enough punch to keep battle fans happy.

As a result of this, and more importantly Zhao’s star turn, “Mulan” is better than expected, and is a perfectly creditable genre entry. Whilst not substantial enough to be the definitive version of the famous story, it does see Ma improving somewhat as a director, and it’s hard to really fault the film as commercial blockbuster fare.

Jingle Ma, Wei Dong (director) / Ting Zhang (screenplay)
CAST: Wei Zhao … Hua Mulan
Jaycee Chan … Fei Xiaohu
Jun Hu … Modu
Kun Chen … Wentai
Rongguang Yu … Hua Hu
Jiao Xu … Young Hua Mulan
Vitas … Wude
Zhou Sun … Emperor
Yuxin Liu … Princess of Rouran

0

阅读 评论 收藏 转载 喜欢 打印举报
已投稿到:
  • 评论加载中,请稍候...
发评论

       

    验证码: 请点击后输入验证码 收听验证码

    发评论

    以上网友发言只代表其个人观点,不代表新浪网的观点或立场。

      

    新浪BLOG意见反馈留言板 不良信息反馈 电话:4006900000 提示音后按1键(按当地市话标准计费) 欢迎批评指正

    新浪简介 | About Sina | 广告服务 | 联系我们 | 招聘信息 | 网站律师 | SINA English | 会员注册 | 产品答疑

    新浪公司 版权所有